hyper

Team Drafted attended Drift’s second annual Hyper Growth conference. It was jam-packed with speakers sharing their unique hyper growth stories and pivotal moments.

Here are nuggets from some of the speakers about hiring and growing your team.

Self-improvement is key

AmyAmy Morin. Amy is an author, mental strength keynote speaker, and a psychotherapist. At Hyper Growth she shared her list of the “13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do”. It’s a powerful list and her book about the 13 things should be put on your company’s reading list. That wasn’t the only take away from Amy. I took the time to see if I could find a nugget from her thoughts on hiring and came across this gem: The One Question Hiring Managers Should Ask (But Rarely Do). Can you guess what that question is?

What do you do for self-improvement?

The power of this question in an interview setting speaks for itself. Whether someone takes the time to read, journal, practice yoga or meditation, these answers will give you more insight into a candidate on a deeper level. And if they don’t believe in self-improvement? Then you should hear how Chaka Pilgrim feels about that.

 

ChakaChaka Pilgrim. Chaka is the president of Roc Nation Records. Yes, she works directly with Jay Z. No big deal. It’s pretty clear she understands what successful people look like and they aren’t the kind of people that don’t believe in self-improvement.

Chaka told the Hyper Growth crowd, “Get away from folks who think they’re already at that top.”

People who seek to better themselves feed your spirit and your soul. Seek them out. 

She may have been talking in the context of who artists surround themselves with, but whether she knew it or not, she was also giving us a reminder of how companies should be building their teams.

Hiring from the CEO’s perspective

MollyMolly Graham. Molly comes from the likes of Google, Facebook, Quip and the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative. She’s played a myriad of roles. At Hyper Growth, Molly gave us the Lego analogy.

Learning to give away any part of your job is key.

One of the hardest internal struggles executives face is having to give away their Legos. Legos being pieces of their job. While your company is in the hyper-growth phase, you’ll be giving away parts of your job every few months, according to Molly’s experience growing and scaling companies. 

 

RyanRyan Deiss. Ryan is the CEO of DigitalMarketer.com and he’s faced the Lego dilemma. In an episode of DigitalMarketer.com’s podcast, Ryan talks about the conclusion he had to come to.   

I’m not going to find somebody who can do everything as well as I can, I’m going to find somebody who can do some aspect of marketing better than I can.

You will never find another you, but you will find people who can do aspects of your job better than you. When you find them, hire them.

 

MikeMike Volpe. Mike is a former CMO from Hubspot and Cybereason and has recently stepped into the role of CEO at Lola.

During his talk about his transition into a CEO role at Hyper Growth Mike stressed the importance of hiring.

Hiring is the most important thing you do.

This isn’t necessarily a big secret, but Mike takes hiring seriously. He’s meeting with potential hires or people who could connect him to a potential hire every day. If hiring is the most important thing you do, dedicate the time to do it every single day. 

When you’re growing your company, “It’s about putting the right people in the right places.”

 

PaulPaul English, Kayak and Lola.com CTO and co-founder always has hiring on his mind. From an episode of Drift’s Seeking Wisdom Podcast, Paul spoke about his hiring obsession.

When I meet people I think am I going to hire this person? And do they know someone I’m going to hire? 

In 2002, he published his hiring manifesto to share his hiring guidelines and philosophy. You can still read it today and learn more than a thing or two from his experience growing teams and companies. 

Marketing and hiring aren’t very different

BarneyBarney Waters. Barney is the president of K-Swiss. At Hyper Growth he recounted his story of turning around a legacy brand. The number takeaway…

 

If you can’t be first, be different.

When companies are competing for the same talent pool, how do you stand out? Maybe you don’t get in front of a candidate first and maybe your company isn’t the first one that comes to mind, but if you’re different enough, it might be exactly what the candidate was looking for. 

 

Did you really think we would write this post without mentioning arguably the most captivating speaker of the day? Jocko Willink, author of Extreme Ownership and former Navy Seal. This last tip comes from me. Pick up his book; for yourself, your current team, your future team and add it to your company’s library.

 

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